sagansense:

Follow the clever collages of Sammy Slabbinck on Tumblr or Facebook

(Source: staceythinx)

Bitcoin Fever Has Spawned 100+ Copycat Cryptocurrencies

seanbonner:

TL;DR - The top competitors are Litecoin, Namecoin, Peercoin, Primecoin, Quarkcoin and Worldcoin.

Namecoin is not a competing currency. Namecoin is distributed domain registration. Using a Namecoin one can hold a domain and the rest of the network will recognize that domain as a unique address.

Like with bitcoin a Namecoin is easily transferable. It holds value because namecoins need to be mined to allow more sites to register and to maintain the Namecoin blockchain. Namecoins and domains with the TLD “.bit” are valuable just like how domain names are valuable now.

Episode 14: The Rivers and the Lakes that you’re used to

Your adventures in National Novel Writing Month.  This podcast covers the event where writers try to complete 50,000 words in 30 days.

EPISODE 14

…And we podcast on!

November is now shrinking in the rear-view mirror but our story isn’t over. What does one do now that they have some massive amount of text? Sure, we could take a break but that wouldn’t be as fun as discussing what else lies ahead. Hopes, dreams, goals, and moments of brutal honesty abound in this episode of Nanowripod.

Don’t forget to leave a review!

Links:

NaNoWriPod Hosts:

  • Ben Alexander runs BlackRectangle.net and is starting his second season of NaNoWrimo. He can be followed on Twitter @mistahben and on the NaNo site at mistahben.
  • Jim Markus, the creator of “Write with Lions”, runs MoreKnown.com  and is starting his sixth season of NaNoWriMo. Jim is on Twitter @jimmarkus and on the NaNo site at jim-markus.

Both can also be heard on the  Stuff Smart People Like Podcast.

This podcast is not affiliated with the Office of Letters and Light, but we encourage you to support their awesome efforts. NaNoWriMo accepts donations on their site.

Internet history: Bitcoin predicted in 1997

Back in 1997 the concept of digital currencies, microblogging and the near ubiquity of smart phones and high speed wireless data were dreams. Cell phones were for voice calls and were prohibitively expensive (not to mention unreliable).

However, in Munich at the “Internet and Politics” conference, Eli Noam presented a paper that outlined much of what would come to be and how governments might react. Not only did the paper mention the generally disruptive capabilities of the internet, which was one of the major features of it from the outset, but Noam pretty clearly foretells of what would become Bitcoin:


"Technology will lead to new types of money — e-money, digital cash, cyber-dollars. This creates “open money,” stateless currencies that compete with each other, that may be accepted around the globe, but are responsible to no one."

Other ideas have not yet taken hold, though they were novel:


"Take the example of intrusion into privacy by telemarketing calls. Both of the parties to a telephone solicitation call attribute a certain utility to their preference to call or to be left alone. Because privacy and access are of value to parties in a telemarketing transaction, exchange transactions will emerge if they become technically feasible. On a practical level, one could envision a Personal-900 Service, in which the calling party pays a fee to the called party. The caller would be automatically informed that the customer charges telemarketers for his time and attention."

The whole piece is full of interesting insights into just what people wanted to make of the internet and how they anticipated it would shape the world. In this paper, much of what Eli Noam predicted appears to have come to pass.


Eli Noam - Regulation and Deregulation of the Internet
Even worse is that the “everybody should learn to code” mindset adds fuel to the wrongheaded tech-solutionist ideology that tech hacks can fix all our problems. And if you don’t have those abilities, well then, perhaps you’re incompatible with our high-tech economy and digital environment. If coding becomes a required skill to navigate a technological environment, then a large part of the population without the privilege of becoming fluent in code will be left behind. It will be the gap between the coding haves and have-nots. A world where filter bubbles and sameness rules over the messy realities of life.
A motivational thought for the end of Nanowrimo

Nanowrimo is rapidly coming to its conclusion. For many participants this is the end. For a few this is merely the beginning.

Whether you completed the goal of fifty thousand words is beside the point now. You’ve either done it or you haven’t. It’s as simple as that. But more importantly this entire month was a test. Part of that test is to find out if you had fun writing. If you did then you have succeeded in the exercise of Nanowrimo. If this was not fun, then you have still learned something.

Throughout the month I’ve been staying motivated by listening to lectures by Alan Watts. His lectures are always illuminating to me.

I think this particular video is especially apt for those who wish to continue in the spirit of Nanowrimo.


Winamp to shut down this December after 15 years
"…it really whips the llama’s ass!"  — Winamp


The tagline that greeted users when they ran Winamp for the first time will now only be a memory.

Winamp, the media player that seemed to burst on the scene just as MP3s were becoming popular has announced that the site and the software will no long be available as of December 20th.

Winamp’s biggest strength was that it supported MP3s from installation.

I remember reading about downloading MP3s and how they wouldn’t play on your computer without a media player that could read the new file type. Winamp was almost invariably the free solution that sites recommended, and throughout high school and college it was my go to media player.


One of the things that led the way to Winamp’s demise was the iPod. iPods relied on iTunes to load music. As people started using iPods, reliance on Winamp dwindled. After the iPod, smartphones and streaming solutions like Spotify and Google Play (as well as Apple’s continued dominance in online music sales) further marginalized the old, steadfast Winamp.

But let’s remember the better times, when you’d load in your entire library of music and set the player to “random” and let it play for days and days on your desktop.

 

Episode 11: My Bar Turned Green

Your adventures in National Novel Writing Month.  This podcast covers the event where writers try to complete 50,000 words in 30 days.

EPISODE 11: My Bar Turned Green

Jim has crossed the 50,000 word threshold with ample time to spare. Ben still has yet to get to half that.

Today we’re talking about sharing unfinished work. While it can be tough to share rough ideas and first drafts, we’ve found that it can be beneficial to the writing process. This (our longest episode to date) finishes off with some in depth discussion on where our Nanowrimo projects need to go next.

And of course a few links:



Listener Question of the Week:  

NaNoWriPod Hosts:

  • Ben Alexander runs BlackRectangle.net and is starting his second season of NaNoWrimo. He can be followed on Twitter @mistahben and on the NaNo site at mistahben.
  • Jim Markus, the creator of “Write with Lions”, runs MoreKnown.com  and is starting his sixth season of NaNoWriMo. Jim is on Twitter @jimmarkus and on the NaNo site at jim-markus.

Both can also be heard on the  Stuff Smart People Like Podcast.

This podcast is not affiliated with the Office of Letters and Light, but we encourage you to support their awesome efforts. NaNoWriMo accepts donations on their site.

Episode 9: Grandolf the Grey

Your adventures in National Novel Writing Month.  This podcast covers the event where writers try to complete 50,000 words in 30 days.

Episode 8: Grandolf the Grey

We pick up with Jim and Ben after the second weekend of Nanowrimo. We talk about how to deal with output that may not meet your own standards, discuss the Snowflake method of plotting and then we pit our stories to more of Jim Butcher’s “Scenes and Sequels” analysis. 

NaNoWriPod Hosts:

  • Ben Alexander runs BlackRectangle.net and is starting his second season of NaNoWrimo. He can be followed on Twitter @mistahben and on the NaNo site at mistahben.
  • Jim Markus, the creator of “Write with Lions”, runs MoreKnown.com  and is starting his sixth season of NaNoWriMo. Jim is on Twitter @jimmarkus and on the NaNo site at jim-markus.

Both can also be heard on the  Stuff Smart People Like Podcast.

This podcast is not affiliated with the Office of Letters and Light, but we encourage you to support their awesome efforts. NaNoWriMo accepts donations on their site.

inu1941-1966:

BRUTUS  2000

inu1941-1966:

BRUTUS  2000

Yet more music to write to

In this, the third installment, I decided to do a little digging based on nostalgia. Don’t worry, I’m not going to inundate you with covers of the Gummi Bears theme.

Instead I was thinking of music that I couldn’t keep out of my CD player back in high school. Two discs in particular were rather unique samplers that I found in Revolution Magazine . 

Revolution  was a music mag dedicated to electronic music and “electronic culture”(which mainly meant a lot of ads for Mindiscs and TDK CD burners). Unfortunately it wasn’t new enough to last more than a few years before folding.

But back to the music! Revolution  had incredible taste in their first few samplers and I’ve collected them into two Youtube playlists. If you are into electronic music like Thievery Corporation you are going to enjoy these.


Deep Summer: Smooth Jams For An Even Tan



 

Thievery Corporation And Revolution Present… Departures

 



Credit to Discogs for helping me with the track listings and artwork.

Episode 8: Come Back from the Brink

Your adventures in National Novel Writing Month.  This podcast covers the event where writers try to complete 50,000 words in 30 days.

EPISODE 8: Come Back from the Brink

Ben de-stresses at the keyboard after a full day without words. Jim has an epiphany that brings him back from the edge of madness. Both love and loathe Scrivener. They wrap everything up with the “sequels” section of Jim Butcher’s Scenes & Sequels notes.

Question for listeners: What’s the deal with Lion-O?

NaNoWriPod Hosts:

  • Ben Alexander runs BlackRectangle.net and is starting his second season of NaNoWrimo. He can be followed on Twitter @mistahben and on the NaNo site at mistahben.
  • Jim Markus, the creator of “Write with Lions”, runs MoreKnown.com  and is starting his sixth season of NaNoWriMo. Jim is on Twitter @jimmarkus and on the NaNo site at jim-markus.

Both can also be heard on the  Stuff Smart People Like Podcast.

This podcast is not affiliated with the Office of Letters and Light, but we encourage you to support their awesome efforts. NaNoWriMo accepts donations on their site.

Episode 7: Chatting with Chris

Your adventures in National Novel Writing Month.  This podcast covers the event where writers try to complete 50,000 words in 30 days.

EPISODE 7: Chatting with Chris

Chris talks about his experience during past Novel Writing Months. We chat about procrastination, the publishing landscape, and the community that surrounds the month. We apologize for the random “meows” that come up during this episode. It was recorded in among a den of cats.

Chris can be found on NaNoWriMo.org under the username: johnveritas 

Question for listeners: Why do you keep coming back to this torturous, painful process every year? Do you recruit friends and family to participate with you?

NaNoWriPod Hosts:

  • Ben Alexander runs BlackRectangle.net and is starting his second season of NaNoWrimo. He can be followed on Twitter @mistahben and on the NaNo site at mistahben.
  • Jim Markus, the creator of “Write with Lions”, runs MoreKnown.com  and is starting his sixth season of NaNoWriMo. Jim is on Twitter @jimmarkus and on the NaNo site at jim-markus.

Both can also be heard on the  Stuff Smart People Like Podcast.

This podcast is not affiliated with the Office of Letters and Light, but we encourage you to support their awesome efforts. NaNoWriMo accepts donations on their site.

Episode 6: ‘Reeling in stories and thinking about Nano’

Your adventures in National Novel Writing Month.  This podcast covers the event where writers try to complete 50,000 words in 30 days.

EPISODE 6: ‘Reeling in stories and thinking about Nano’

Jim and Ben catch up after the first weekend of NaNoWriMo and compare experiences. Then we explore in more detail Jim Butcher’s “Scene and Sequel" method of writing, and try it out live!

Question for listeners: Have you tried constructing a scene based on “Scenes and Sequels”?

NaNoWriPod Hosts:

  • Ben Alexander runs BlackRectangle.net and is starting his second season of NaNoWrimo. He can be followed on Twitter @mistahben and on the NaNo site at mistahben.
  • Jim Markus, the creator of “Write with Lions”, runs MoreKnown.com  and is starting his sixth season of NaNoWriMo. Jim is on Twitter @jimmarkus and on the NaNo site at jim-markus.

Both can also be heard on the  Stuff Smart People Like Podcast.

This podcast is not affiliated with the Office of Letters and Light, but we encourage you to support their awesome efforts. NaNoWriMo accepts donations on their site.

Scrivener Differences Between the Mac and Windows Versions

For those of you who may have started your nanowrimo with the excellent word processor, Scrivener, you may want to take a look at this. While the application is great on both Mac and Windows platforms, be aware that they are not exactly the same. This link details what is missing in the Windows version.